Category Archives: Argyll

Notes Of A Meeting Between Brendan O’Hara MP With Constituents At Ardrishaig, 11 November 2016

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The meeting was organised by Ardrishaig Church Eco-Group with support from Christian Aid.
Brendan made a short presentation on climate justice including the following points:

  • Had previously met constituents to discuss climate justice and Malawi. The impact of climate change on Malawi shows us that poverty and climate change are closely linked. Women, in particular, are impacted.
  • We are responsible so we have to think of our impact on others. The impacts are global but the poor always take the brunt.
  • UK ministry of defence is concerned about defence implications of climate change, leading to displacement, forced migration, and social dislocation. The MoD suggests by 2040 75% of the world’s population will live in megacities, driven in part by climate migration.

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Discussion Points

Government in London has to recognise the diversity of circumstances across the UK and energy policy needs to reflect this. The UK government policy on renewable is bad and retrogressive as is the election of Donald Trump. But we can work locally and with partners overseas to address specific problems.

  • How do we change attitudes towards energy use?
  • Critical of Hinckley Point decision and in favour of wind power in Argyll. Members of audience critical of large energy companies role in renewables and in grid ownership.
  • Climate change is scary, and our philosophy of economic growth is part of the problem.
  • We cannot challenge people in Africa or elsewhere seeking a better standard of living. Cultural imperialism promotes aspirations to our way of life in developing countries.
  • We embrace international trade yet much of the trade is in products that useless, short life and destined for the bin. How do we get out of this trap? Does the circular economy make sense?
  • VAT on repairs, such as shoe repairs is a disincentive and encourages the purchase of new products. Can the government look at this?
  • Proposed cut in APD by Scottish Government raises some awkward questions as does the Heathrow expansion.

Contact

Brendan happy to put forward questions from constituents to the UK Government. Contact him at: brendan.ohara.mp@parliament.uk
Note : Adrian Shaw

“Speak out against Climate Change” Meeting in Ardrishaig, Friday 11th Nov 2016.

Friday 11th Nov. 2016

Speak out against Climate Change” Meeting in Ardrishaig Public Hall from 6.00-7.30pm, arranged by Ardrishaig Church Eco Group, and attended by MP Brendan O’Hara. (Tea/coffee and snacks available prior to the meeting.)

 

Speak out against Climate Change.

The Open Meeting in the Public Hall, on Nov. 11th, run by Ardrishaig Church Eco Group is to enable us to share in the Christian Aid campaign to encourage our politicians to focus on the commitments made at the Paris Conference last December. These commitments were recently ratified, in order to reduce dramatically the levels of carbon emissions, which are going to prove disastrous across our planet unless urgent action is taken. The Scottish Government has a serious commitment to green energy, via wind power, etc. But we need to ensure the UK government shares that commitment. In what ways should we campaign? On what issues would you want our MP to focus?

  • Following the 3rd Heathrow runway decision, do you support the campaign “Tax planes; subsidise trains”? (especially re short haul flights?)
  • Should the government subsidise rural bus services more?
  • Should there be more emphasis, (especially in Scotland), on wave power and solar energy, and off-shore or very local wind power, not land based ones that require huge infrastructure?
  • Should there be more encouragement, via local grants, and tax reductions, for local businesses in rural areas, and small towns, so people do not always have to travel to large urban areas for shopping, etc?

These are just a few suggestions for questions which could be put to Brendan O’Hara on 11th November – and you probably have many more. Please come along to this meeting, and encourage your friends and family to come along, too!

North Argyll mini-gathering Saturday 17th September

The North Argyll Eco-Congregation Scotland network is hosting a mini-gathering on Saturday 17th September in Glencruitten House and gardens, just outside Oban.  We hope to welcome friends and supporters from all of Argyll and also from surrounding areas within reach of Oban.  More details and registration forms will be circulated later, but please note the key information – date, time and place.

Click Here to download the programme

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Ardrishaig Parish Church Eco-Congregation mentioned in US newspaper.

The link between Ardrishaig Parish Church (an eco-congregation) and Montreat Presbyterian Church (an Earth Care congregation from North Carolina) has been mentioned in an article in Black Mountain News (part of the USA Today network):

Meanwhile, others from Montreat Presbyterian visited Scotland in 2015 for a much smaller scale meeting. As a result, the church has “twinned” with a congregation located in Argyll, 90 miles west of Glasgow.

Ardrishaig Parish Church is recognized as an “Eco-Congregation” of the Church of Scotland, and Montreat Presbyterian Church (MPC) is an “Earth Care Congregation” of the Presbyterian Church (USA). In a formal statement of cooperation the two similar-sized churches have agreed “to pray for and encourage each other’s ministry, to share ideas and promising and/or successful practices which may be our own or those of our larger communities, to be a voice for the care of creation within our communities and nations, and to pray and work for the day when all God’s people are united in loving care of the world we have been given.”

To read the full article Click Here.

 

 

Ardrishaig Church Eco Group Coffee Morning.

A date for your diary – please note that the Eco group will be holding its Annual Coffee Morning on Saturday 16th January 2016, from 10.00 till 12.00 in the North Hall, Ardrishaig.

As usual, part the proceeds from this will be used towards Eco Group expenses, (for example, our membership of Eco Congregation Scotland, and costs which will be incurred in any projects we undertake, such as the development of the garden at the Church Hall).

This year, we are proposing to send the rest of the proceeds to the Toilet Twinning Scheme, run by TEAR Fund. This provides for the building of toilets, either for individual homes, (costing £60.00 each), or schools, (costing £240.00 for a block) specifically in rural areas in the developing world.

Here are some statistics about the need for proper toilets:
“Lack of access to clean water and proper sanitation traps people in poverty. Their health suffers and the prospect of developing economically remains far out of reach. Here are some of the hard facts:

  • 2.4 billion people across the world don’t have somewhere safe to go to the toilet (WHO / UNICEF)
  • 1 billion people don’t have access to any sanitation at all and openly defecate (WHO / UNICEF)
  • There are 46 countries where at least half the population does not have access to proper sanitation (WHO)
  • 748 million people lack access to clean, safe drinking water (WHO / UNICEF)
  • Poor sanitation is one of the world’s biggest killers: it hits women, children, old and sick people hardest
  • Every day, about 1,400 children under the age of five die of illnesses linked to unclean water and poor sanitation. That’s more than half a million a year – or about one a minute (UNICEF)
  • Diarrhoea is the second biggest killer of children under five worldwide (CHERG)
  • More than half of primary schools in developing countries don’t have access to water and sanitation. Without toilets, girls often drop out at puberty (UNICEF)
  • The lack of a loo makes women and girls a target for sexual assault as they go to the toilet in the open, late at night. Many get bitten by snakes as they squat in the grass
  • In Africa alone, people spend 40 billion hours every year just walking to collect water. Women and girls carry two-thirds of this burden
  • Poor water and sanitation result in economic losses estimated at £153 billion annually in developing countries, or 1.5% of their GDP (UNICEF)
  • For every £1 spent on a water and sanitation programme, £8 is returned through saved time, increased productivity and reduced health costs (UNDP)
  • In 2000, 189 countries signed up to the UN Millennium Development Goals. The sanitation target for 2015 is currently way off-target and may not be met in sub-Saharan African for another 150 years”

(TEAR fund)