Tag Archives: Christian Aid Scotland

Christian Aid: Building Hope

Church volunteers from our West Fife and (North) Fife Local Networks invite you to hear from Charlie Meiklejohn of Christian Aid Scotland on the Christmas appeal and climate justice work, with facilitated discussion on climate and Christmas using ALTERnativity resources.

Eco-Congregation Scotland enjoys a strong partnership with Christian Aid, recognising that the overseas aid charity increasingly responds to the climate crisis and its impact on the Global South, while joining us in supporting a Just and Green Recovery for Scotland.

Christian Aid: Building Hope
Thursday 17th December 2020, 1.00pm
2.00pm

Please register below for the Zoom meeting link:

Christian Aid: Building Hope

Christian Aid: Building Hope
Friday 11th December 2020, 3.30pm
4.30pm

Volunteers from our Helensburgh & Lomond and Stirling Local Networks invite you to hear from Charlie Meiklejohn of Christian Aid Scotland on their Christmas appeal and climate justice work, with facilitated discussion on climate and Christmas using ALTERnativity resources.

Eco-Congregation Scotland enjoys a strong partnership with Christian Aid, recognising that the overseas aid charity increasingly responds to the climate crisis and its impact on the Global South.

Please register below for the Zoom meeting link:

Scottish Episcopal Church votes to go net zero by 2030

Urgent action to be taken in response to the global climate emergency

Christian environmental and development charities Eco-Congregation Scotland, Christian Aid and Operation Noah today joyfully welcome the decision of the Scottish Episcopal Church, at their General Synod, to set a 2030 net zero carbon emissions target. 

The motion was proposed by Rev’d Elaine Garman, Interim Convener of the Church in Society Committee for the Scottish Episcopal Church. Speaking ahead of the motion being carried, she said, ‘We are in a climate emergency… We all must act and act now. As a Church we must lead… Our motion today is designed to enable the Scottish Episcopal Church…in reducing our negative impact on our climate… We can be part of Scotland’s preparations for the COP26 climate summit next year.’ 

The motion, passed by General Synod, reads: ‘That this Synod, expressing the need for urgent action in relation to the global climate emergency, call on the Church in Society Committee, working in conjunction with other appropriate bodies, to bring forward a programme of actions to General Synod 2021 to resource the Scottish Episcopal Church in working towards achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2030.’

The decision to set a 2030 net zero target is especially significant as Glasgow prepares to host the UN climate talks, COP26, in November 2021.

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The Provost of St Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral in Edinburgh, The Very Rev’d John Conway, welcomed the motion: ‘This is an important first step for the Scottish Episcopal Church, showing our commitment to action in the face of the depth of the climate crisis. Responding to the climate emergency is the most urgent task facing us all, requiring all the spiritual and intellectual resources available. To speak with any authority about that spiritual task of living more simply, however, requires us to put our own house in order, and this motion sets us on that road. I look forward to the resources offered to help us all move to being carbon neutral in 10 years time.’

In June 2019, the Scottish Episcopal Church General Synod voted to change its ethical investment policy following a motion proposed by the Rev’d Diana Hall, Rector of St Anne’s, Dunbar. The motion stated that ‘the ethical investment policy be updated to reflect the moral imperative to divest fully from fossil fuels’.

Since then, an Ethical Investment Advisory Group (EIAG) has been established. which gave its first report to General Synod today. The report stated that the Church has sold its direct investments in fossil fuel companies, but continues to invest in fossil fuels indirectly through its pooled funds.

At General Synod, there were calls for the Scottish Episcopal Church to publicly announce its commitment to divest from fossil fuels and to complete the divestment process as soon as possible. In his speech to the General Synod, The Very Re’vd John Conway welcomed the work done to date by the EIAG and asked the Church’s College of Bishops to sign the Scottish Churches COP26 Pledge: Divestment and the Just and Green Recovery, which was recently launched by Eco-Congregation Scotland and other partners.

We are really pleased to see that our supporting Churches are backing the priority to aim for net zero by 2030, which will bring changes to local congregations and their members.

Mary Sweetland, Eco-Congregation Scotland chairperson

The decision of the Scottish Episcopal Church to reach net zero emissions in the next decade follows the Church of England decision to set a 2030 net zero carbon target in February 2020. Both are in the worldwide Anglican Communion, a family of churches in more than 165 countries.

The Church of Scotland set a 2030 net zero target at the General Assembly in October 2020 when its Faith Impact Forum successfully proposed ‘for the Church to transition both locally and nationally to net zero carbon emissions by 2030’. Many local authorities have also made this pledge, including the City Councils of Edinburgh and Glasgow.

Mary Sweetland, chairperson of Eco-Congregation Scotland, said: ‘We are really pleased to see that our supporting Churches are backing the priority to aim for net zero by 2030, which will bring changes to local congregations and their members.’

Sally Foster-Fulton, Head of Christian Aid Scotland, said: ‘Only this week the Secretary General of the United Nations told the world we have a climate emergency which is impacting most heavily on the world’s most vulnerable people. We know all too well here at Christian Aid that those who have done the least to cause the problem suffer the most. And so it’s really encouraging that today the Scottish Episcopal Church has decided to commit to net zero emissions by 2030. As 2020 draws to a close, we can look ahead to COP26 in Glasgow alongside our Church partners in Scotland, as they continue to pursue decisions that will lead to climate justice for those living on the sharp end of the climate emergency.’

Christian Aid holds a vision of a better world, free from poverty and climate change. For over ten years, Christian Aid Scotland has been campaigning for the UK and Scottish Governments to take climate change seriously for the benefit of those who are impacted first and worst by its effects.  Operation Noah is a Christian charity working with the Church across all Christian denominations to inspire action on climate change.

James Buchanan, Bright Now Campaign Manager at Operation Noah said: ‘It is wonderful news that the Scottish Episcopal Church has set a target of reaching net zero emissions by 2030. In order to demonstrate leadership on the climate crisis ahead of the UN climate talks in Glasgow next year, it is vital that the Scottish Episcopal Church supports a just and green recovery from Covid-19 by completing divestment from fossil fuel companies and investing in the clean technologies of the future.’

The motion passed by the Scottish Episcopal Church General Synod reads as follows: ‘That this Synod, expressing the need for urgent action in relation to the global climate emergency, call on the Church in Society Committee, working in conjunction with other appropriate bodies, to bring forward a programme of actions to General Synod 2021 to resource the Scottish Episcopal Church in working towards achieving net zero carbon emissions by 2030.’

Criticism for UK Aid cut

Leading Christian international development charities have condemned UK Government plans to cut overseas aid from the pledged 0.7% of Gross National Income.

Christian Aid Scotland head and Eco-Congregation Scotland trustee Sally Foster-Fulton joined Rev Susan Brown, Church of Scotland Faith Impact Forum convener, in “Life and Work” to criticise the announcement by Chancellor Rishi Sunak.

Hundreds of churches across the country are supporting Christian Aid this first Sunday of Advent, singing or sharing ‘When Out of Poverty is Born‘, with collective worship in hope and solidarity for the world’s poorest.

SCIAF (Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund) urges us to take action now, contacting our MPs and tweeting messages for the Prime Minister, Chancellor and Foreign Secretary.

Tearfund Scotland said the cut “couldn’t have come at a worse time for people living in poverty”, asking us to please pray for vulnerable communities pushed to the brink of survival every day.

Please support our aid charities – and key partners of Eco-Congregation Scotland – in campaigning and praying for this vital support to continue, maintaining our global connections to address climate justice.