Tag Archives: Climate Emergency

Scotland’s Climate Week: Climate Conversation

What will life be like in 2030?

How will we all be living?

What changes do you want to see in your local community, and across Scotland by 2030?

Join our Climate Conversation to consider what our options might be – locally and nationally – in reducing the causes and effects of a changing climate.

This takes place during Scotland’s Climate Week (13th–19th September 2021),
when organisations across the country aim to promote the message that,
together, we can end Scotland’s contribution to climate change.

Climate Conversation with North Motherwell Parish Kirk Session.

The Scottish Government has initiated these conversations to encourage
a discussion about how we can reduce the emissions that cause
climate change and prepare for a changing climate.

Please register for the Zoom meeting link below:

Let’s talk about the climate emergency – Sharing the things you have

Tools and gadgets. We seem to be obsessed with them.

Have you any of the following items sitting in a cupboard, shed or garage at home: steam wallpaper stripper, powerwasher, long ladder, tree loppers, sewing machine, steam cleaner.

If you do, how often do you use them? Do they sit on the shelf for most of the year?

All these tools have a cost to the planet to produce- they contain mineral resources, and the manufacturing processes have a cost in terms of the amount of carbon produced in making the goods.

Are they items that you need to own or could you hire or share them with friends and neighbours?

A circular economy is one where we aim to make the very best use of the Earth’s resources and eliminate waste, by recycling materials, repairing and repurposing goods, and sharing tools and other items.

Join us as we talk about our relationship with ‘possessions’. How could we do things differently and reduce our impact on the planet?

Monday 30th August 2021,  7.30pm – 8.30pm via Zoom

Please register below to receive the link to join us for the evening.

 

Breathe – Fresh Air for All: Let’s talk about the climate emergency

As Scotland comes into the spotlight hosting COP26 – the United Nations climate talks due in Glasgow this November – we are calling on all Scotland’s churches to join the conversation and take action on the climate emergency.

One of the most powerful ways we can encourage change is in talking, listening and telling our stories. Eco-Congregation Scotland has produced “Let’s talk about the climate emergency“, monthly themed resources to help congregations take part in awareness raising conversations about the climate emergency, encouraging everyone to take action.

Throughout July our theme has been “Breathe – Fresh Air for All“.

We all breathe. Our bodies are programmed to take breaths in and out for us. Breathing is not a function that we are conscious of, until it becomes difficult for us. Article 24 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child, talks about children enjoying the right to the best possible health, with access to clean water, good food and a clean environment to live in, and lays an obligation on richer countries to help poorer countries achieve this. Yet air pollution is a problem in many parts of the world, including areas of
Scotland. Air pollution has direct links to ill health and the presence of air pollution exacerbates health conditions such as asthma.

Air pollution comes from a variety of sources such as motor vehicles, aircraft, industry, volcanic ash and wildfires. Our actions and choices about the kinds of transport we choose and the goods we purchase can have a direct affect on the ability of children to enjoy their right to as good health as is possible for them.

  • Have you noticed any effects of air pollution in Scotland?

  • How could we reduce our demand for newly manufactured goods?

  • How could we make sure that our use of transport, goods and other services doesn’t stop children enjoying their right to as good health as is possible for them?

  • If you had to make one change to the way you travel or the things you buy tomorrow to help reduce pollution, what would it be?

  • Are there any practical actions that society could take to clean up the air we breathe? 

Download the July resource here.

Monday 26 July 2021 at 7.30pm on Zoom.

Please fill in the form below to register to join us for the event:

Let’s talk about the climate emergency – Healthy transport?

As Scotland comes into the spotlight hosting COP26 – the United Nations climate talks due in Glasgow this November – we are calling on all Scotland’s churches to join the conversation and take action on the climate emergency.

One of the most powerful ways we can encourage change is in talking, listening and telling our stories. Eco-Congregation Scotland has produced “Let’s talk about the climate emergency“, monthly themed resources to help congregations take part in awareness raising conversations about the climate emergency, encouraging everyone to take action.

Throughout June our theme has been “Healthy transport“.

Transport emissions are Scotland’s single largest source of greenhouse gases, accounting for 36%  and only reducing 0.5% since the 1990s.

Where you live and where you work will make a difference to the kinds of transport you use. If you live in a city with good public transport links, that may be your preferred way of getting around. If you live in the countryside with few buses going near your home you may rely on having your own car or motorbike to get to out and about, even to go to the nearest shops. If you don’t have far to go from home to work perhaps you simply walk, roll in your wheelchair or take your bike.

Some types of transport have a larger impact on the environment than others. Engines that use fossil fuels have a larger carbon footprint and so do more harm to the planet than electric vehicles. Using public transport is better as one engine gets many people around.

Active travel by foot, bike and wheelchair is even better. It’s healthy for us and the planet too.

What transport choices do you make?

Download the June resource here.

Monday 28 June 2021 at 7.30pm on Zoom.

Please fill in the form below to register to join us for the event:

Let’s talk about the climate emergency – Coasts and Seas

As Scotland comes into the spotlight hosting COP26 in Glasgow this November, it becomes imperative that Scotland’s churches join the conversation and take action on the climate emergency.

One of the most powerful ways we can encourage change is in talking, listening and telling our stories. Eco-Congregation Scotland has produced Let’s talk about the climate emergency, a pack of monthly themed resources to help congregations begin a series of awareness raising conversations about the climate emergency and to encourage everyone to take action.

Throughout March our theme has been Coasts and Seas.

Scotland has a beautiful coastline, offering a variety of seascapes from the wild cliffs that are home to cathedrals of sea birds to flat rolling sandy beaches with mobile dune systems. The coast has always had an important place in Scottish life too, for example Nairn was known as the Riviera of the North and was the must-visit holiday destination for generations from wealthy Victorians to family “staycations,’ peaking in the 1970s. “Going to the beach” has been a highlight of so many childhood memories, days spent making sandcastles on clean sandy beaches.

Marine pollution is now noticeable all along our coastline and also in our rivers. Plastic bottles, cigarette butts, cotton buds, crisp bags and sanitary applicators form the top five pollutants found on beaches. Much of this waste enters the food chain.

Fishing is still an important part of the economy and identity of many coastal communities. However, it is not without controversy – for example, fishing quotas lead to edible fish being returned dead to the sea and overfishing of sandeels has reduced a vital source of food for sea birds. Climate change will bring sea-level rises and more extreme weather, which will affect vulnerable parts of Scotland’s coasts and threaten the very existence of some nations and communities across the world.

Conversation Starters:

  • Talk about a time when you have enjoyed time at the coast. How does the sea make you feel?

  • Do you experience connection to God at the seashore?

  • Have you ever found litter on the beach?

  • How do you feel about current fishing methods and quotas?


Please register your details below to receive the Zoom meeting link:

Coasts and Seas

Let’s talk about the climate emergency

Let’s talk about the climate emergency – Coasts and Seas
Monday 29th March 2021
7.30pm – 8.30pm

https://www.ecocongregationscotland.org/event/coastsandseas/

As Scotland comes into the spotlight hosting COP26 – the United Nations climate talks due in Glasgow this November – we are calling on all Scotland’s churches to join the conversation and take action on the climate emergency.

One of the most powerful ways we can encourage change is in talking, listening and telling our stories. Eco-Congregation Scotland has produced “Let’s talk about the climate emergency“, monthly themed resources to help congregations take part in awareness raising conversations about the climate emergency, encouraging everyone to take action.

Throughout March our theme has been Coasts and Seas. Scotland has a beautiful coastline, but marine pollution is now noticeable all along our coasts and in our rivers. Plastic bottles, cigarette butts, cotton buds, crisp bags and sanitary applicators form the top five pollutants found on beaches. Much of this waste enters the food chain.

Fishing is still an important part of the economy and identity of many coastal communities. However, it is not without controversy. Climate change will bring sea-level rises and more extreme weather, which will affect vulnerable parts of Scotland’s coasts and threaten the very existence of some nations and communities across the world.

Join us on Zoom, to talk and reflect on Coasts and Seas – you can download the two March pages on this link, or the full year of “Let’s talk about the climate emergency” resources. Breakout discussions will ensure all taking part in small groups. Now and in coming months – let’s talk about the climate emergency.

https://www.ecocongregationscotland.org/event/coastsandseas/

For all working in the marine environment, for the protection of the marine environment by all people and by politicians, for all communities and nations affected by increasing sea levels due to climate change.

Jesus,
you walked on the shore of Lake Galilee,
at a threshold of land and water.

You loved those who worked at that threshold,
calling them to come,
forgiving them their mistakes,
and sending them to share your love.

Rev Jenny Adams
Duffus, Spynie and Hopeman Church minister
Eco-Congregation Scotland trustee

Let’s talk about the climate emergency – Keeping warm

As Scotland comes into the spotlight hosting COP26 in Glasgow this November, it becomes imperative that Scotland’s churches join the conversation and take action on the climate emergency.

One of the most powerful ways we can encourage change is in talking, listening and telling our stories. Eco-Congregation Scotland has produced Let’s talk about the climate emergency, a pack of monthly themed resources to help congregations begin a series of  awareness raising conversations about the climate emergency and to encourage everyone to take action.

 

Throughout February our theme has been Keeping warm.

Scottish weather means cold, wet weather for a large part of the year. We are only too glad to be indoors through the coldest winter weather, but our homes need to be heated to make them comfortable.

Many of us live in older houses. The construction of these homes would not have included lots of insulation and double glazing.

Gas, oil and electricity are commonly used to heat our homes. Wood burners and coal fires create additional heat sources in many homes too.

All of these types of heating produce greenhouse gases contributing to global warming. Pollutants from some types of heating reduce the quality of the air we breathe.

Conversation Starters:

  • How was your home heated when you were a child? Do you use the same kind of heating now? How did your Great Granny keep warm in the coldest months of the year?

  • What kinds of things can we do to reduce our need for heating in our homes?

  • How do you think homes of the future should be kept warm?

  • Fuel poverty is a big issue in Scotland. Do you know what is being done to help address it?


Please register your details below to receive the Zoom meeting link: